Friday, October 16, 2020

New: Ckornoments

 In the process of updating CemeteryWalk, I noticed that many grave markers have decorated corners, most often with a floral motif. These decorations were the inspiration for the creation of Ckornoments, a typeface family of corner ornaments. It contains 23 sets of four ornaments, for top right and left and bottom right and left. The family has two styles, solid and outline. The two styles were designed to be used in layers, but can also be used separately. In addition, the floral designs are separated into parts so that the flower can be a different color than the rest of the design. 

Although they were inspired by tombstones, the ornaments can be used for purposes unrelated to cemeteries. For example, they can be used to frame a page or poster or as dividers between sections of text in newsletters.

Ckornoments is available at myfonts.

Monday, October 12, 2020

Expanding BetterIngriana

BetterIngriana is one of several typefaces in the IngrimayneType collection that was created by blending two different typefaces. In this case it was Ingriana, an informal serifed typeface, and BetterTypeRight, a typeface with large, rounded serifs. The bold is very bold compared to the regular so an obvious way to expand the family was to create a new semi-bold style between the two existing styles. In the picture below, the new weight is shown in yellow.

BetterIngriana is available from myfonts and fontspring.

Tuesday, October 6, 2020

Expanding IngrianEuroikaH

IngrianEuroikaH is one of several typefaces in the IngrimayneType collection that was created by blending two different typefaces. In this case it was Ingriana, an informal serifed typeface, and Euroika, a decorative serifed typeface with high contrast. The bold is very bold compared to the regular so an obvious way to expand the family was to create a new semi-bold style between the two existing styles. In the picture below, the new weight is shown in yellow.

IngrianEuroika is a very legible text font despite some peculiarities due to the way it was constructed.

The revised family is available at myfonts and fontspring.

Thursday, October 1, 2020

Revising CemeteryWalk

In 2018 I designed CemeteryWalk for a local cemetery-walk event. In September I thought it might be useful to add a few more images of tombstone art to the fonts, and once I started, I kept thinking of other improvements I could make. I ended up adding an alternative set of letters, reachable with the OpenType stylistic alternatives feature, as well as a set of accented characters used in various European languages. The set of alternatives takes letters from the typeface RoundWhy, which like Roundup used in the original set of letters, has reverse contrast. 

As for the added images, they became a separate font, CemeteryWalk-Art. The font began with images that I had previously designed, was supplemented from ideas I found on the Internet, and was completed by designs based on tombstone art in a local cemetery. Below are some of the images that were based on images from the local cemetery. Some but not all of the pictures in the typeface have both a silhouette and an outlined form that can be used together in layers, as in the picture below.
Until the early 20th century many of the images on gravestones had symbolic meaning. For example, there are two flower buds with a broken stems in the picture above. They were a symbol used on the grave of a child, a person who died before blooming. Flowers remain common on markers but now they seem to be more decorative than symbolic.

The revised and expanded CemeteryWalk family is available at myfonts and fontspring.

Monday, September 21, 2020

Updating AndrewAndreas

In 1994 I designed AndrewAndreas, an all-purpose sans-serif face useful for both text and display. It was a low-contrast family with three weights, a regular, a bold, and an extra-bold. At the time a three-weight family was not unusually sparse, but today it is for a legible sans. Hence, it was time for an update, adding more weights and also oblique styles, because sometimes text calls for italics and modern word processors do not fake italics in the way that some ancient programs did. The new AndrewAndreas family has twelve members in six weights, each with an oblique style. In the picture below the original members are show in white.

The oblique styles simply slant the upright styles and do not change the letter forms. However, these style (except for the black-oblique style) contain three sets open-type stylistic alternatives that can make the oblique styles look more like true italics by altering letters a, f, i j, and l, as illustrated below.
In 2019 I created a 30-font family of sans-serif faces called Yassitf that was also intended to be a versatile family useful for both text and display. Below is a comparison of it and AndrewAndreas, with AndrewAndreas first and Yassitf below it. Two weights are used for the comparison. There are many small differences.
The revised AndrewAndreas family is available on myfonts and fontspring.

Friday, September 11, 2020

TessieSomeMore

TessieSomeMore is a new typeface of tessellations in the Tessie series. Like the previous 18 members, it consists of two styles, a solid style that must be properly colored to be useful and an outlined style that can be used alone or in a layer over the solid style.
Most of the tessellations are Escher-like, that is, they resemble real-world objects such as insects (16), birds (11), animals (6), other objects or symbols (4). Another ten are not Escher-like but are geometric or abstract shapes that are visually appealing.
Most were designed with the aid of Tesselmaniac!. A few resemble shapes in previous Tessie fonts but were different enough that I included them. The tessellations include 27 different items from the Gr├╝nbaum and Shepard classification and eleven from the Heesch classification.
TessieSomeMore is available at myfonts.

Tuesday, August 18, 2020

Kwalett

After expanding the Qualettee family, I wondered if the thinnest member could be used to build a sans-serif family with low contrast that would work better than Qualettee for blocks of text. The result is a ten font family that I named Kwalett. It inherits the large x-height from Qualettee.
The picture below shows Kwalett at the top and Yassitf, another sans-serif face that works well for text, below. Kwalett was printed at 35 points and Yassitf at 33 and then both enlarged.
Below shows the difference between Kwalett and Qualettee. Most letters have a similar shape, but the differences in contrast make them easy to differentiate.
Kwalett is available from myfonts.